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live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations take a loo
humanitarian exchange. it's been a wonderful way for us to work together on some of these common issues and figure out how our agencies are all going to integrate. i think the time and effort that has been expended by both the military planners and also the civilian planners is definitely going to be bearing fruit in years to come when something happens. i know we are quite a bit ahead of time, you are going to have a 20-minute break from now and then our next speaker will come up at that point. thank you again. he heads the baur row of medicine for the navy. i lacked at his bay oh in the program, educated in georgia and he's had a great career in the navy commanding several hospitals, winning several awards and his most recent command was as the commander of walter reed, and i was so glad that he was here to hear the panel that we had with our medical peer to peer exercise. and he's going to talk to us now about navy medicine. with that, please help me welcome vice admiral matthew nathan. (applause). >> thank you, general, very much. well, it's a pleasure here and i'm honored to b
how that would apply if we're using those folks in a humanitarian disaster in california. we're able to treat our folks regardless of the state of licensing in a particular state, though. >> last year when i took a look at the shock trauma platoon, and i'm going to talk to you about that one really cool thing i saw. i have a little bit of medical experience and to see they have effectively a robotic soldier that can go into defib, whose eyes can dilate, they can do pulses both radial and distal and there is a programmer who is effectively testing a battlefield soldier what to do, i found absolutely fascinating as a way to bring a real life experience to that individual. for me that was a fantastic tool that you have and i thought that was wonderful. >> we're going to be -- little advertisement -- we're going to be demonstrating that capability at our display at the marina green so if you'd like to come see that, that's available. >> any final questions? i'd like to thank our panelists very much. as rob mentioned earlier, the exercise series we have put on and started 3 years ago h
here, they told us that sewage would be here shortly. and here it is 43 years later and we still don't have it. my husband and i went to the first meeting. he always said, "boy, i'll never see it in my lifetime." well... my husband passed away last december. man: right now, the wastewater in herminie is going to basically three places -- in the street, down mine shafts, or into the creeks. i think we're very lucky that we haven't had some kind of serious health problem. sabljak: i came up one morning to get my newspaper, and there was this pool of stench up here. there was a pipe spouting, like a fountain, with everything coming out. everything was on the road already. i could see toilet paper. i could see other things that were... that you would put in a sewer. mcmillen: well, i was actually born and raised in westmoreland county so i have been aware of the conditions in herminie all my life. herminie has declined, because for any type of business of any size to come in and create jobs, they need the infrastructure there, and in herminie, it's just not there. narrator: to address co
that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in to see people with a drink in their hands, getting to know maybe somebody new, may be looking for a day, or chatting with friends. there jellyfish. i mean, they are beautiful. >> the culmination of the animals. >> it is very impressive. we do not have this at home. >> tell us a little about some of the spider's we see here on display. >> at th
of using profanity but because it was a different lapd. it was rumored that the mexican mafia was allowed to meet in his church and that he held guns for gang members. and he was helping gang members across the border. i am certain he knew where the body of jimmy hoffa was buried when you got done listening to the rumors. now, the lapd uses home with industries as an integral part of its anti-gang efforts. not all of them, not 9000 members, but i can tell you this, homeboy industries have their annual benefit to honor people in the community as well as former gang members, the person they honored was chief charlie of the lapd. unless you think that was an anomaly, the year before they honored the sheriff. there is an alliance between community-based organizations, and law-enforcement. this is not enough. there has also been in the streets, ongoing, a relationship, a delicate one, a thoughtful one between the loss angeles police department and gang intervention. interventionists are former gang members. they have to be very careful about how they play out the relationship. they do not want
. i am done. that was his turning point. call it a turning point, called the teachable moment. use whatever terminology that you want. that is where we need to be present. when i say we, i mean, we. at that turning point, at that moment of truth, that teachable moment, it is imperative that resources be brought to bear. now, what are the two most impressive resources that are brought to bear at that moment. there are two major forces that helped gang members change. one of them is tattoo removal. this is the first major force in the denunciation. the second is legal assistance. surprising. you did not see this on the video and i never thought of this. the first thing individuals need, not to feel like gang members -- is to erase their past. they have literally talked with me about feeling -- removing these tattoos and legal excitement. it is not that simple. changing from being a gang member to a former gang member involves a change in identity. this is a tricky process. it is slow and steady, and there is frustration. the gang is replaced with drugs, and there are fallbacks. relap
, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed the valves for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a re
to remove it at the drinking water treatment plant. lloyd: what epa said to us was, "you can have an exemption from filtration "if you keep this undeveloped, "and if you can manage the wastewater so that it does not pollute your water supply." and we feel that we've reached the point where we can really keep it clean enough to drink unfiltered for the indefinite future. and new york city is in a small club of cities that actually have that filtration avoidance waiver. narrator: while municipalities are responsible for maintaining systems and source supply, the standards that protect water are established at the federal level. there are two important pieces of federal legislation that were both enacted in the early to mid-1970s. the first was the clean water act, which acts to protect rivers and lakes, and sources of drinking water. the second was the safe drinking water act, that provides federal standards to assure the safety of the water that we drink. both acts have been amended since they were first adopted, and they're both cornerstones for the water issues that we face in am
merced where it's high and i believe those units should be used to house homeless people with the revenue generates from the war profits tax so that's what i would propose in dealing with the homeless issue. >> all right. thank you sir. mr. rogers. >> you know sadly the 50% of the homeless are actually vietnam veterans and so this makes homelessness really a national embarrassment. in the past they had post traumatic stress disorder was claimed to be -- the people had it before they were in war, before they went through a terribly difficult time and they did not provide the people any money. fortunately with the obama administration this has changed and these people are coming back and being able to be given some money, so on the federal level i think there's some improvement. when it comes to san francisco i think we need to do more, and i would research this further and answer that question later. thank you. >> all right thank you sir. >> i am under the assumption i'm a problem solver. first you have to identify the problem and i would lump this into three groups. you have people wh
just grew up together. there were no handouts and no one told us how to conduct ourselves. and tell us what to wear. someone could have a school fight, and we may be at the mall, and see the person we have a fight with. the army and navy have their bar fights. i did not see this as being a game, or a community. supporting each other, this may have been in a negative way. i did not have a stable household. many of them do not of their fathers are, where their father is dead. in their return, the block i gave up -- this is who i looked up to. he had a notorious reputation. there was the violence and in return, we had the pros and cons for that. a lot of people would mess with me because of who my father was -- to my brother was. they became my enemies. it was not a choice. this is just how was. let's go get him. and it comes to the place, you get tired of running. i did not see this as being wrong. what people defined as a gang, that must be a gang member right there. i have tattoos on my arm and neck and hand, and none of them are getting associated. they all tell personal story in my l
locked but i believe in this case we need to have balance. we have a housing trust before us this november they believe needs to be replacing the redevelopment agency which has indexes for salaries of folks that can benefit from an affordable housing policy. i would also say that most homes and apartments and condo conversions need to be near transportation and retail wraps. we have things up in hunter's point and treasure island coming on point and with that i hope park merced gets built but not without tenant protections and that's what i suggest. >> thank you. i want to remind you we're taking questions from the audience so if we have more questions is a good time to collect those. looks like everybody dealt with the park merced issue so our next question is how would you solve the homelessness problem in san francisco? and we will start with mr. garcia. >> my god, what an easy question. of course we're not going to solve it. the best we can do is try to minimize it and i think we are on the right track and we have a new homeless czar in pl dusty and i like the de
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)

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